Announcement SGC Prepares to Develop Regional Climate Collaborative Program

Published:

Senate Bill 1072 (Leyva, Chapter 377, Statutes of 2018) established the Regional Climate Collaborative Program (RCC). California Strategic Growth Council (SGC) will administer RCC to help under-resourced communities (based on various definitions identified in the State’s Health and Safety Code, see “What are ‘under-resourced communities’?” below) across California build regional capacity and collaboration to develop and implement climate change mitigation and adaptation projects. Each collaborative will bring together key partners to build community-driven leadership, knowledge, skills, experience, and resources to develop a vision for a sustainable region and access public funding to support it. The program’s enabling legislation requires SGC to establish both criteria for developing the regional collaboratives, and a grant program to support their activities.

The adopted 2019-2020 State Budget included funding at SGC for three staff positions to implement SB 1072. SGC is in the process of hiring a Program Manager, an Analyst, and an Assistant who will join SGC’s Community Assistance Program Manager to form a new team. Together, these staff will develop technical assistance guidelines, conduct outreach and analysis to identify potential communities to participate in the program, and establish program guidelines.

By July 1, 2020, SGC expects to publish guidelines that outline technical assistance policies, standards, and best practices for delivering technical assistance to under-resourced communities. After that, SGC staff will develop and publish RCC Program Guidelines.

Watch SGC’s website, newsletter, and social media channels for more information about this program as it develops.

What are “under-resources communities?”

SB 1072 uses “Under-resourced community” to refer identified pursuant to one, some, or all of the following sections of the Health and Safety Code:

  • Section 39711, which reads, “The California Environmental Protection Agency shall identify disadvantaged communities … [that] may include, but are not limited to, either of the following: (1) Areas disproportionately affected by environmental pollution and other hazards that can lead to negative public health effects, exposure, or environmental degradation. (2) Areas with concentrations of people that are of low income, high unemployment, low levels of homeownership, high rent burden, sensitive populations, or low levels of educational attainment.
  • Subdivision (d) of Section 39713 of the Health and Safety Code, which reads, “(1) ‘Low-income households are those with household incomes at or below 80 percent of the statewide median income or with household incomes at or below the threshold designated as low income by the Department of Housing and Community Development's list of state income limits adopted pursuant to Section 50093. (2) ‘Low-income communities’ are census tracts with median household incomes at or below 80 percent of the statewide median income or with median household incomes at or below the threshold designated as low income by the Department of Housing and Community Development's list of state income limits adopted pursuant to Section 50093 .
  • Subdivision (g) of Section 75005, which reads, “’Disadvantaged community’ means a community with a median household income less than 80% of the statewide average. ‘Severely disadvantaged community’ means a community with a median household income less than 60% of the statewide average.”